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Google Nexus S

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Google Nexus S tillverkad av Samsung. Androidbaserad telefon med fyratumsskärm, ARM Cortex A8-processor på 1 000 MHz, 16 GB minne och en kamera på fem megapixel. Lanserades i december 2010. Stäng
Google Nexus S tillverkad av Samsung. Androidbaserad telefon med fyratumsskärm, ARM Cortex A8-processor på 1 000 MHz, 16 GB minne och en kamera på fem megapixel. Lanserades i dece... Läs mer
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Externa recensioner om Google Nexus S
  • Inget betyg
    Google Nexus S

    Plus

    • Formatet
    • Skärmen
    • Snabbheten
    • Snabba Androiduppdateringar

    Minus

    • Videofunktioner
    • Få extrafunktioner  

    10 år sedan
  • Inget betyg
    10 år sedan
  • Samsung Nexus S 4G Review

    Plus

    • Fast performance
    • Good quality screen
    • Robust communications suite with 4G and NFC

    Minus

    • No microSD slot

    9 år sedan
  • Google Nexus S Android phone

    Plus

    • Android 2.3, contoured Super AMOLED display, good battery life

    Minus

    • Plastic finish, crashing issues, no microSD card slot, poor quality of voice calls

    ConclusionThe Google Nexus S Android phone isn't a revolutionary smartphone, but remains an excellent option thanks to the 2.3 "Gingerbread" version of Android.

    9 år sedan
  • Samsung Nexus S Review

    Plus

    • Latest version of the Android OS
    • Excellent screen
    • Responsive device

    Minus

    • Extremely low voice quality
    • No memory car slot
    • No zoom on the camera

    10 år sedan
  • Google Nexus S mobile phone review

    Wired: Integrated Google services a snap to set up. Wealth ofapps. Super speedy processor makes quick work of tasks.Slick-looking, almost symphonic form-factor; Contour Display andhand-friendly backside are a delight to talk to. More deeplyconnected to the internet than your basement-dwelling, neck-beardeduncle.Tired: Interface seemingly still designed primarily for dudes whodig binary. Greatly improved multitouch text selection means textediting is now merely horrible instead of atrociously shameful.Autocorrect seemingly programmed by non-native Englishspeaker.

    10 år sedan
  • Google Nexus S review

    Plus

    • Snappy OS
    • Android 2.3 with early future updates
    • Stunning AMOLED screen
    • Improved battery life
    • Cool lock screen animation

    Minus

    • Underpowered UI
    • Not enough Home screen widgets
    • Slight freezing at times
    • Light design
    • Random phone restarting

    Conclusion
    We've always been impressed by the trajectory of Android, and with each passing iteration it's got closer to being a bit less for the hackers and more for the mainstream (although its open source ethos has remained).The Google Nexus S is designed to be the device that showcases the power of Android 2.3 and comes without the constraints of network upgrade delays – if Google updates something, the Nexus S community will be the first to know.Don't be fooled by all the hype, though: the Nexus S is pretty much just a hopped-up Galaxy S. Sure, it's got the fancy screen and NFC chip inside, but once the Samsung model gets beefed up to Android 2.3, there won't be a huge amount to choose between the two (as long as the terrible lag is fixed).We likedAndroid is an OS that's going places, there's no doubt about that. It bridges the gap between iPhone and Symbian^3 phones such as the Nokia N8 very well, giving open source opportunities with a very well-done UI.The operation is virtually judder-free, the GPU under the hood pushed the animations along at a wicked rate, and the burgeoning Android Market app store makes the Google Nexus S a very well-specified phone.The Google Maps and Navigations offerings are still superb, with easy to use software and a dedicated Car Mode making locating yourself a very simple task.Things like the beautiful screen are obviously a stand-out joy to use, and we're of the opinion that the bulging bottom and plastic cover is nice to hold rather than a poor version of the metallic phones out there.We dislikedThe lack of a comma on the keyboard might sound like a little issue, but to us, it's massive and could quickly get annoying. Sure, you can download another keyboard to solve the issue, or tinker with the settings, but that's not what you should have to do out the box to make the phone a decent proposition.The text wrapping on the internet browser was hard to get right too, and sadly hasn't got better with time – is it too much to ask for that we get a phone with the ability to zoom in and out of text and show it all at once?The lack of microSD slot is terrible as well. Samsung prides itself on being a media-centric company, so we think it must have been removed at Google's request, although for the life of us we can't think why.The price of the Nexus S is ridiculously high for the average gadget lover. Sure, it has some neat features but we reckon that slightly curved display added a few quid to the cost of manufacturing, and had it been flat the world wouldn't have simultaneously wept and cursed the ground the Android development team walked on.UPDATE: Google has slashed the price of the phone just before launch, making it a lot more palatable at a little over £400 - much better, and just in time.The constant restarting is an issue as well, plus that double letter thing from the keyboard is insanely annoying.VerdictIt's a tricky one to rate, the Google Nexus S. A good place to start would be the obvious: it's a cracking phone, with a lot to be excited about.For instance, the NFC chip is going to be a real boon in the future we reckon – Google's got plans for that tech, and that's partly why the Google Nexus S was created, to highlight what can be done on a handset.From the moment you pick up the phone (assuming you don't hate the plastic feeling) and turn it on, you know you're getting something special – even the booting screen looks amazingly sharp.The stuff Android gets right is all here on this phone – widgets, an easy-to-access notifications bar, easy-to-use applications and a dearth of openness about the underlying system make this attractive to both the man on the street who wants the latest phone and the modder who wants to root and play and customise to his or her heart's content.Android is certainly maturing at a fantastic rate – you can do so much now, and the incremental improvements to features such as the keyboard show that there's a lot of potential with this OS to iron out any bugs.But it's not a five -star experience on the Google Nexus S for a number of reasons: the ever so slight jumpiness and lagging, while very much not a big issue, take the gloss off the Android effect.The sub-par media player needs updating badly, and the lack of a microSD slot is bound to irk some.You've also got the benefit of being the first to receive the updates to Android version xx whenever it arrives – no more kicking your heels and waiting for your network to service your needs.In short, there's nothing wrong with the Google Nexus S. In areas, such as the internet browser and improved battery life, it shines, and the overall feeling is one of a great phone that's going to grow with you as you discover little tweaks, tricks and the best new apps.But while there's nothing to anger you about this phone, there will be times when it irritates you slightly, when the screen freezes momentarily or when a call scrambles its brain.If you love Android in its purest form, then the Google Nexus S is the phone for you. If you like it a little more feature rich, check out the HTC range. And (whisper it) if you're agnostic and can afford it, the Nexus S is still not an iPhone beater, so make sure you check out all your options first.

    10 år sedan
  • Google Nexus S Android smartphone

    Cool, innovative device with an eye to snatch Apple’s smartphone crown.

    10 år sedan
  • Google Nexus S review

    It's the best Android phone on the market in terms of performance and features, but it's not necessarily the best value and build quality could be better.

    10 år sedan
  • Verdict
    The Android equivalent of the business. Astounding.

    10 år sedan
  • Google Nexus S review

    STUFF SAYS...
    Though the styling tends more to flashy than chic, this is a highly desirable Android phone

  • Google Nexus S Review

    Plus

    • Android 2.3 Gingerbread
    • Brilliant Super AMOLED display
    • Above average battery life
    • NFC chip
    • Great calling quality

    Minus

    • Same old Samsung Galaxy S design
    • Below average photos & video recording

  • Google Nexus S 4G Review

    Plus

    • Very fast, unadulterated Android experience
    • Updates directly from Google
    • Amazing display
    • Good battery life and call quality

    Minus

    • No expandable memory
    • Potential 4G issues

  • Google Nexus S - Succeeding the One

    Plus

      Strong battery life , Smooth and fast interface , Easy handling

    Minus

      No remarkable hardware upgrades , Easily smudged due to glossy surface

    Score Details

    • Design:: 9
    • Features:: 8.5
    • User-Friendliness:: 9
    • Performance:: 9.5
    • Value:: 8.5

    ConclusionA new year brings with it a new Google Android device, i.e. the Google Nexus S. While the S was never specifically named by Google, we think the word 'successor' is a perfect fit. Of course, it's also a nod back towards the Samsung Galaxy S, since it is nearly the same device that was introduced by Samsung back in 2010. Subtle differences do exist between these two Android devices.The more obvious change comes from the relocation of its microUSB and 3.5mm ports from the crown to the bottom of the Nexus S. The handling feels very much as you would get from the Galaxy S, right up to the rear curved edge. A 1GHz Hummingbird (yes, the same chip used by the Galaxy S) powers the Nexus S. Running the show for its interface is the latest Google Android 2.3, otherwise fondly known as Gingerbread. Retaining the benefits from its earlier version 2.2 such as Adobe Flash support and wireless tethering, minor and maybe not too obvious improvements are implemented across the board. These include a shortcut to manage your apps from the sub menu and a quick switch from your rear to front camera for imaging purposes. What really impressed us, was the smooth and swift interface when we interacted with the Nexus S. Using Android-specific benchmark apps such as Quadrant and NeoCore, the Nexus S returned scores that were slightly higher than its Galaxy S counterparts. While it was heavily loaded with apps in the background, video playback was exceedingly smooth and had no discernible frame losses. On the same track, its multimedia performance was well-aided by the 4-inch Super AMOLED display and some decent audio performance to go with it. The 5-megapixel camera completes the multimedia suite, with sharp images and well-balanced colors found on its images. With an extensive feature list, the Nexus S scored well on our battery test at 7.5 hours of continuous video playback. Even so, its stamina is still very dependent on one's usage pattern. With a single charge, it held out for nearly a day mixed with intensive usage and idle standby. With all the hype over upcoming dual-core smartphones, you might find yourself sitting on the fence for the Nexus S. While we've seen a fair share of those prototypes in action, we're still sometime away from getting a retail ready phone to pass a verdict. Till then, the Google Nexus S has shown us what it's capable of and we're overall pretty satisfied with the first proper implementation of the updated Andorid OS.  if you have set your mind on getting the Nexus S, we see it as a worthy investment. Unfortunately, getting your hands on the Nexus S will be a tough affair. Unlike the earlier Nexus One which was available for purchase via the Google phone site, the Nexus S opts to take the retailer route. Retailing at US$529.99 in the United States, you can use that as an estimate to search through sites such as Ebay or Amazon for potential sellers of the device. Alternatively, you can cross your fingers for the Nexus S to be available through your local service provider and enjoy the contracted price. Even then, you might not get the exact same Nexus S, with rumors pointing at a variant without the Super AMOLED display or the absence of the near-field communications. So keep a sharp eye on these developments and stick with us as we bring you further updates from the mobile phone scene.

  • Samsung Nexus S - Branded Gingerbread

    Plus

      Above average battery life , Smooth and fast interface , Easy handling

    Minus

      Lower stamina than Google Nexus S and Samsung Galaxy S , No remarkable hardware upgrades , Easily smudged due to glossy surface

    Score Details

    • Design:: 9
    • Features:: 8.5
    • User-Friendliness:: 9
    • Performance:: 8.5
    • Value:: 8.5

    ConclusionA new year brings with it a new Google Android device, i.e. the Google / Samsung Nexus S. While the "S" was never specifically named by Google, we think the word 'successor' is a perfect fit. Of course, it's also a nod back towards the Samsung Galaxy S, since it is nearly the same device that was introduced by Samsung back in 2010. The follow-up Samsung variant with the S-LCD display is a sure indication of Android's popularity and adoption in the mobile industry. Subtle differences do exist between these two Android devices.The more obvious change comes from the relocation of its microUSB and 3.5mm ports from the crown to the bottom of the Nexus S. The handling feels very much as you would get from the Galaxy S, right up to the rear curved edge. A 1GHz Hummingbird (yes, the same chip used by the Galaxy S) powers the Nexus S. Running the show for its interface is the latest Google Android 2.3, otherwise fondly known as Gingerbread. Retaining the benefits from its earlier version 2.2 such as Adobe Flash support and wireless tethering, minor and maybe not too obvious improvements are implemented across the board. These include a shortcut to manage your apps from the sub menu and a quick switch from your rear to front camera for imaging purposes. What really impressed us, was the smooth and swift interface when we interacted with the Nexus S. Using Android-specific benchmark apps such as Quadrant and NeoCore, the Nexus S returned scores that were higher than its Galaxy S counterparts. While it was heavily loaded with apps in the background, video playback was exceedingly smooth and had no discernible frame losses. On the same track, even with a swapped S-LCD display, its multimedia performance was fine and dandy, with some decent audio performance to go with it. The 5-megapixel camera completes the multimedia suite, with sharp images and well-balanced colors found on its images. The downside is apparent when we got only 5.3 hours off the Samsung variant. Should you consider it against its Google Nexus S and Samsung Galaxy S siblings, the Samsung Nexus S isn't able to match up to their 7+ hours lifespan. Yet, we can't deny that there are worse examples out there, smartphones that aren't even able to sustain up to three hours in our grueling test with similar specifications to the Samsung Nexus S. Even so, its stamina is still very dependent on one's usage pattern. With a single charge, it held out for nearly a day mixed with spurts of intensive usage and idle standby. With all the hype over upcoming dual-core smartphones, you might find yourself sitting on the fence for the Google / Samsung Nexus S. While we've seen a fair share of those prototypes in action, we've yet to encounter enough of these phones in retail to pass a verdict (the only one we've tested so far is the LG Optimus 2X and that didn't hold out too well in battery life). Till then, the Google / Samsung Nexus S has shown us what it's capable of and we're overall pretty satisfied with the a proper implementation of the updated Andorid OS.  If you prefer the Google Nexus S over its Samsung variant, getting your hands on it will be a tough affair. Unlike the earlier Nexus One which was available for purchase via the Google phone site, the Google Nexus S opts to take the retailer route. Retailing at US$529.99 in the United States, you can use that as an estimate to search through sites such as Ebay or Amazon for potential sellers of the device. Fortunately, the Samsung Nexus S is an easier target. Retailing at S$828 without contract, the Samsung Nexus S is also available under a two-year contract with the Singapore telcos. With it, you'll also get Android 2.3 available immediately on the Samsung Nexus S. And if you're adamant about staying with the Samsung Galaxy S (seeing how both devices are so similar), you can consider that option, if you're willing to wait for the Android 2.3 update that's coming to the Samsung Galaxy S in a few months' time.

  • Google Nexus S review

    Conclusion We can see why Google chose the Samsung handset design to show off its Gingerbread 2.3 OS – unlike the many HTC and LG devices, it’s distinctive. Judged against the stunning Desire HD, however, the Google Nexus S is unable to convince us of its supremacy.

  • Google Nexus S review

    Plus

      Excellent glare-resistant screen; outstanding battery life; improved messaging input; fast operating.

    Minus

      No micro-SD slot; pinch to zoom not fully enabled.

    ConclusionThe Nexus S has slotted in nicely as the head of the Android family, but it does lack a user-friendly overlay such as HTC Sense. The device is likely to be the premier Android handset for a good chunk of 2011, although it is not an essential purchase until NFC takes off. 

  • Inget betyg
    Samsung Google Nexus S Android smartphone

    Plus

    • Quad-band GSM and tri-band 3G support
    • HSDPA, 7.2 Mbps; HSUPA, 5.76 Mbps
    • 4.0" WVGA (480x800) Super AMOLED Contour Display with curved glass screen
    • Android OS, v2.3 Gingerbread
    • 1 GHz ARM Cortex-A8 (Hummingbird) processor
    • 16GB storage, 512 MB RAM
    • 5 MP autofocus camera with LED flash and geotagging
    • Front-facing VGA camera
    • Wi-Fi b/g/n with DLNA
    • GPS with A-GPS
    • Portable Wi-Fi hotspot and stereo Bluetooth v2.1
    • Near Field Communication chip
    • Accelerometer, proximity and light sensors
    • Standard 3.5 mm audio jack
    • microUSB port (charging)
    • Adobe Flash support out of the box
    • Latest Google Mobile apps

    Minus

    • No microSD slot
    • No 720p video recording
    • All-plastic body, fingerprint magnet
    • No DivX and XviD support (no actual video player) out of the box
    • No dedicated camera key and no lens cover
    • No FM radio
    • No smart dialing
    • Overly expensive for its feature set

    3 år sedan
  • Inget betyg
    Google Nexus S review

    Although it's not perfect, the Nexus S is the best Android smartphone yet, if only because it's currently the only one with Android 2.3. If you're buying SIM-free, then the Nexus S is the Android phone to get – it costs just £30 more than a SIM-free Galaxy S, our previous favourite. However, when purchased on a 24 month Vodafone contract, the Nexus S costs a total of £123 more than the Galaxy S – whether this is worth it to you depends on how much you want the camera flash and immediate Android updates.

  • Inget betyg
    Google Nexus S

    Plus

    • Excellent screen
    • Great feeling phone in the hand
    • Fast
    • Access to all the Android goodies
    • Keyboard improvements are great

    Minus

    • Not the greatest video player
    • No HD video capture
    • Lacks the consumer extras that rival devices will offer you

    Conclusion We love the hardware the Google Nexus S presents. Even if it is “just” an update of the Samsung Galaxy S (remember we loved that too…) the curved screen and the shapely back make the Nexus S a distinctive and comfortable phone to use. The screen is a star too and we’ve been singing the praises for Super AMOLED for a while, with the Nexus S bringing bucket loads of colour to the party. But does the Google Nexus S have a unique proposition? Is there anything it does that you can’t find elsewhere? One thing is that you are unhampered by third-party tinkering with your phone. Some say that Android is still too raw as a consumer operating system, but we have to disagree. Android in its naked form is slick, fast and powerful; it is refreshing to come back to the basic underlying OS and get away from all the additional layers that manufacturers plaster on top.The downside is that you are then left to fill in the gaps yourself. The Nexus S isn’t the most fully featured phone out of the box, with Motorola, HTC and Samsung themselves offering a range of extras you simply don’t get here.You may also have to pay a lot up front for the Google Nexus S. Priced at £549 SIM free in the UK from Carphone Warehouse or Best Buy; Carphone Warehouse are also offering a range of deals with a contract starting at £35. If Android is what you want, this is the purest form you’ll find and it is well worth considering.

  • Inget betyg
    10 år sedan
  • Inget betyg
    9 år sedan

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