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Sony Xperia S

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Xperia S - Sonys första mobil utan Ericsson sedan 2001 bygger vidare på den populära Xperia-serien men med ny design. Fortfarande androidbaserad, med 12-megapixelkamera och 1,5 GHz dubbelkärnig processor. Lanserad 2012. Stäng
Xperia S - Sonys första mobil utan Ericsson sedan 2001 bygger vidare på den populära Xperia-serien men med ny design. Fortfarande androidbaserad, med 12-megapixelkamera och 1,5 GH... Läs mer
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Externa recensioner om Sony Xperia S
  • Test av Sony Xperia S

    Telefoni & Data: 8/10
    Multimedia: 10/10
    System & Program: 8/10
    Användarupplevelse: 7/10
    Material & kvalitet: 8/10

    Toppbetyg

    8 år sedan
  • Sony Xperia S: En riktig fullträff i debuten

    Men hur vi än vrider och vänder på prestanda och pris står det klart att Sonys intåg på marknaden för smarta mobiler är en fullträff. Det är en fantastiskt bra telefon som briljerar. Köper du den här lär du bli lycklig. Så enkelt är det.


    +
    Skärmen
    Designen
    Prestanda
    Kameran

    -
    Ingen minnesutbyggnad

    =
    En snabb, bra och framför allt vacker telefon med en fantastisk och högupplöst skärm. NFC-taggarna är ett roligt tillbehör och det finns ingenting alls som talar mot den här telefonen egentligen.

    BETYG
    Form/design: 10
    Ergonomi: 8
    Funktioner: 9
    Användarvänlighet: 9
    Prisvärde: 8

    8 år sedan
  • Inget betyg
    Sony Xperia S [Recension]

    Sony Xperia S är lämplig för dig som:
    Vill ha en androidtelefon med en skärm av absolut toppklass
    Vill ha androidmarknadens just nu bästa kamera
    Vill ha finfin prestanda såväl vad gäller spel, webbläsare och appkörning
    Vill ha en bra videospelare med rikligt format-/codecstöd
    Lägger stor vikt vid en modern och unik design

    Sony Xperia S är inte lämplig för dig som:
    Frustreras av missade knapptryckningar (ej skärmtryckningar)
    Absolut måste ha det allra senaste i hårdvaruväg (quad core)
    Ställer extremt höga krav på material-/kvalitetskänsla samt passform
    Kräver en batteritid långt utöver det vanliga

    8 år sedan
  • Inget betyg
    8 år sedan
  • Sony Xperia S

    Plus

    • Simple comfortable design
    • HD screen is great
    • Good overall performance

    Minus

    • No expandable memory
    • Camera is way below expectations
    • Screen and design don't quite set our hearts alight

    2 år sedan
  • Sony Xperia S review

    Plus

    • Fantastic screen
    • NFC capability
    • High quality camera
    • Premium build
    • Large internal storage

    Minus

    • Easy to drop
    • No microSD slot
    • Slightly poor battery life
    • Fat chassis
    • Only Android 2.3

    Conclusion
    It might not be cheap (yet), but we're impressed with the power and poise of Sony's first solo foray

    7 år sedan
  • Sony Xperia S review

    The Xperia S has a great 12.1-megapixel camera, but is let down by its screen and lack of Android 4.0

    8 år sedan
  • Sony Xperia S review

    HARDWARE 9/10
    The body of the Xperia S feels solid, weighty and well made, while the camera produces great stills and video. Battery life?s around the big-screened smartphone usual, but the lack of SD card support and a non-removable battery may annoy some. The display?s the star, though, looking amazingly sharp here in 720p resolution.

    SOFTWARE 8/10
    We?re going to have to be harsh and chip off a point or two for not arriving with Android 4.0 onboard. Sony?s Android 2.3.7 and the many custom user interface tweaks and additions make it a great phone to use, no doubt about that, but a boatload of new models are about to arrive with Google?s ?Ice Cream Sandwich? update onboard, which may make Sony?s flagship appear a little dated.

    PERFORMANCE: 9/10
    The dual-core processor handled everything we threw at it with ease. Web pages fly around with no issues and apps install and open quickly, while the camera and its quick launch option take the fuss out of whipping out your phone to take a shot.

    OVERALL: 9/10
    The Xperia S is larger and less flamboyant than last year?s Xperia Arc, offering rock-solid performance behind the highest quality display you?ll find anywhere today. The case could be a little more stylish and the capacitive buttons can be slightly awkward, but those issues are soon forgotten when you see the phone?s super-sharp screen in action.

    8 år sedan
  • Sony Xperia S

    Plus

    • Very high-res screen; Fast dual-core chip; Good camera.

    Minus

    • Needs an upgrade to Ice Cream Sandwich; Clunky handset design; No microSD card slot.

    Conclusion
    The Sony Xperia S has an undeniably gorgeous HD screen, high-quality audio, an impressive camera and plenty of clout. But it's let down by clunky handset design and software that could be more streamlined.

    8 år sedan
  • Sony Xperia S NXT series Android smartphone

    Flagship Android handset featuring a high definition display, dual core CPU and a 12Mp camera.

    8 år sedan
  • Sony Xperia S: En riktig fullträff i debuten

    Det är en fantastiskt bra telefon som briljerar. Köper du den här lär du bli lycklig. Så enkelt är det.

    +
    Skärmen
    Designen
    Prestanda
    Kameran

    -
    Ingen minnesutbyggnad

    =
    En snabb, bra och framför allt vacker telefon med en fantastisk och högupplöst skärm. NFC-taggarna är ett roligt tillbehör och det finns ingenting alls som talar mot den här telefonen egentligen.

    8 år sedan
  • Sony Xperia S Review - Phone Reviews and Video

    Sony Xperia S - verdict
    The Xperia S may be the first Sony smartphone to drop the Ericsson moniker, but make no mistake - this is not a greenhorn smartphone. The combination of a powerful dual-core processor, a stunning 4.3in screen and smart NFC and media sharing capability make the Sony Xperia S one of the best Android devices currently available, besting the flagship Samsung Galaxy Nexus in most areas bar the lack of Ice Cream Sandwich out of the box. If you want to stray over from the Apple camp and try the very best that Android has to offer, you couldn't go far wrong with the Sony Xperia S.

    8 år sedan
  • Sony Xperia S Review

    Plus

    • Very good photo and video quality
    • One second from sleep to snap
    • Quality HD display with ultra-high pixel density
    • Distinguished design with a transparent illuminated strip
    • Hearty 32GB of internal storage
    • Strong loudspeaker with clean sound
    • Good call quality
    • Rapid battery charging

    Minus

    • The capacitive button dots are hard to spot and not very responsive
    • Sealed battery compartment
    • No memory expansion slot

  • Sony Xperia S

    Plus

    • Distinct design
    • High resolution display
    • Good camera performance
    • NFC
    • Stable

    Minus

    • No microSD card slot
    • Battery not accessible
    • No Mac support for file transfer
    • Doesn't seem to make huge steps forward

    Conclusion It's perhaps too simplistic to slam Sony Mobile's flagship handset because it isn't running on the latest processor hardware. Device performance isn't governed simply by hardware, there's a huge dollop of software in there too, even if top-notch hardware will side step some software foibles.The real judge of a phone should be suitability to task. The Sony Xperia S performs well on a number of levels. General performance is good, it has been stable for us to daily use, and we didn't encounter any critical flaws in performance.Overall, with every pro there is a con with the Xperia S. The design may be distinctive, but it lacks grip. The screen is wonderfully high resolution, but the lack of microSD is annoying. Sony's interface isn't too oppressive, but launching with a promised Android update is annoying.The Sony Xperia S is possibly the most compelling Xperia handset yet, but it could do more. It's a good phone, a pleasure to use and live with, but there is some space for improvement.

  • Sony Xperia S - Start Button

    Plus

      Intuitive customized user interface , Vivid and rich colors from a 720p display , Smooth performance from dual-core 1.5GHz processor

    Minus

      Low battery mileage , Below average imaging performance , Stiff physical buttons

    Score Details

    • Design:: 7
    • Features:: 8.5
    • User-Friendliness:: 8
    • Performance:: 7.5
    • Value:: 8

    ConclusionSony Ericsson, you will be missed. But that does not translate to the end of the smartphone line from the 50-50 joint venture between Sony and Ericsson. Instead, with Sony receiving full ownership and renaming the company as Sony Mobile Communications, we have seen their first smartphone, the Sony Xperia S making its debut at the annual Consumer Electronics Show earlier on. Being the first of the NXT series that also has the recently announced Sony Xperia P and Sony Xperia U, this is going to be a bumper year for Sony. In our earlier hands-on, we mentioned how the Xperia S departs from its earlier Arc design. Instead of the curvature concept, the NXT series adopts a more angular look. While the Xperia S did fit naturally as per our earlier impressions, our extended time with the review unit did reveal a potential issue. As we spent more time flipping through apps and pages on the 4.3-inch display, the edge of the smartphone dug into our palms, making it slightly uncomfortable over time. What makes the Xperia S (and for that matter, the upcoming Xperia P and Xperia U) stand out from the crowd is one particular design element - its transparent band. Located right below the three capacitive touch buttons, you’ll also see the inconspicuous back, home and menu icons that identify their functions. Though there are three small dots to indicate where the capacitive buttons are, we found ourselves fiddling around the area before it managed to register an input from our fingers. While we have to leave it to our imagination as to how the Xperia user interface will turn out with the Android 4.0 update, it’s safe to say that the three buttons will be just as indicative of the new back, menu and multi-task shortcuts on the Ice Cream Sandwich version. Along the side, you’ll find the thin volume and camera buttons. As we’ve stated earlier on, the stiff buttons aren’t exactly helpful. The same can be said for the power button, which is placed at the upper left corner of the crown. This is further exacerbated by how tight the covers are for the micro USB and HDMI ports. And if you’re worried about fingerprint smudges across the Xperia S, take comfort in the fact that the Android smartphone choses to go with a matte material. We absolutely love the lack of fingerprints across the device, but its 4.3-inch display isn’t spared from that particular fate. Due care has to be taken to grip the phone properly though, since we had a few heart-stopping moments when the Xperia S slipped through our fingers and almost hit the ground. Like all Android smartphones, there’s a need for the Xperia S to differentiate itself and present a unique proposition. The most obvious element is seen through the user interface, with Sony adding a touch of its own via unique live wallpapers and themes for you to switch around. Timescape, which has been featured since the first Xperia smartphone, is also featured on the Xperia S, though not as prominent as it used to. In fact, we chose to go with standard Facebook and Twitter apps, or even TweetDeck for Android, rather than Timescape to view all our social media feed. If you’re hoping to find the latest Android 4.0 on the Xperia, we’ll have to disappoint you. Preloaded with Google 2.3 Gingerbread, the good news is the Xperia S will be receiving the Android 4.0 update anytime soon. In the meantime, we do see some semblance of the Android 4.0 interface being emulated by Sony’s user interface, such as folders and the ability to uninstall apps from the menu. To simplify the ways in which you interact with the Xperia S, Sony also included the LiveWare app within the smartphone. It essentially launches pre-defined apps when an accessory is plugged into the Xperia S. Take for example, if you plug in a pair of headphones, LiveWare will detect the headphones and prompt to launch the music player app. By default, three accessory profiles, namely your headset, headphones and charger are customizable within LiveWare. Bluetooth devices can also be added to the LiveWare manager. In a similar concept, Sony has added more customization options to the Xperia S through the use of near field communications and two Xperia SmartTags that are included within the retail package. As we’ve explained through an earlier demo by Sony, the SmartTag is essentially an NFC token that works in conjunction with the NFC function on the Xperia S. A simple tap on the token will prompt the Xperia S to perform a series of customizable actions, such as switching on Wi-Fi, setting the phone to silent or even launching specific apps. We found this NFC feature particularly useful, especially if you were to move between your home and office. For example, once we got home and plugged the Xperia S to a charger, we also tapped the token to set the phone to silent mode, and deactivated all data syncing. The Xperia S choses to go with Qualcomm’s Snapdragon dual-core processor clocked at 1.5GHz, along with 1GB of RAM to handle multi-tasking. As mentioned earlier, Google Android 2.3 will be the operating system of choice for the Xperia S. As usual, we subject the review unit to the Quadrant benchmark, which can be found on the Android Market. To gauge how it performs against the competition, we matched its scores against similar devices using dual-core processors such as the Samsung Galaxy S II, HTC Sensation XE and LG Optimus 2X. As depicted in the chart above, the Xperia S fared quite well against the Sensation XE and LG Optimus 2X. Against NVIDIA’s Tegra 2 processors, we have seen the Qualcomm Snapdragon MSM8260 chipset performing better in numbers. Comparing the Sensation XE and Xperia S, both of which are using that particular Qualcomm processor, we can deduce that the higher Quadrant score for the Xperia S means Sony has managed to optimize its user interface much better than HTC Sense. Putting the numbers aside, the Xperia S is no slowpoke. Throughout the testing phase, we were greeted with fast app transitions, and it didn’t take too long for the web browser to render its pages. Running the Xperia S through a gauntlet of games also saw smooth performance for the most part, and for that we attribute it to the 1GB RAM and 1.5GHz dual-core processor. The Xperia S arms itself with a 12-megapixel camera, but as far as the pixel count goes, higher doesn’t equate to better. While the images gathered from our camera test setup did reveal good color reproduction from the camera, noise levels were significantly high. We were also unable to see a sharp contrast between the finer areas within the test image. To be fair, you won’t really need images of the highest quality from your smartphone, but it feels as though you are getting shortchanged by the 12-megapixel sensor. The camera might have disappointed us, but this wasn’t the case for its 4.3-inch display. With a resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels, this gives the Xperia S a pixel density of approximately 342ppi. If the dense resolution isn’t enough, we can attest to the rich colors that were seen on the display, no doubt enhanced by the Mobile Bravia display technology. In fact, with the same test video, we noticed how the colors on the Xperia S were more vivid than the Samsung Galaxy Nexus. Using that same 480 x 800-pixel video, we next ran our standard battery test. The test parameters include having the video looped under the following conditions: Again, this is where the Xperia S faltered. As impressed as we were with its smooth performance, all that is for naught if the battery mileage doesn’t deliver. Amongst the crop of dual-core smartphones, the Xperia S came in last, sharing nearly the same mileage as the Sensation XE. Incidentally, both devices are using the Qualcomm MSM8260 processor, and we presume there is a possible connection there. With its below average mileage, its portability index also doesn’t fare too well, though thankfully, it placed third amongst its immediate competitors. Outside of the intensive battery test, we had the Xperia S working for us for nearly 16 hours before we saw the 15% battery warning sign. If we were to judge the Sony Xperia S based on first impressions, we would have been bowled over by its angular design along with the unique transparent band. Spending more time with it did bring up some unseen pros and cons of this Android smartphone. The dual-core 1.5GHz processor did well to eliminate speed slowdowns and lags on the user interface. Furthermore, you get unique features such as a customized user interface, the freedom to customize your phone’s profile through its LiveWare manager, as well as NFC and SmartTags. We also like the vivid colors exhibited by the 4.3-inch, 1280 x 720 display. Other than how it slipped out of our palms once too often, the Xperia S won’t get many points from us with its stiff buttons. Though it does come with 32GB of internal storage, the lack of an external storage option doesn’t bode well for those who want to carry their entire media library with them on their smartphone. Also, with its below average battery life, the Xperia S lost our attention once it was exhausted. We weren’t too impressed with its imaging capabilities either, so if you prioritize imaging performance above all others, this will be a deal breaker. Now that we've shared with you our findings, it's up to you to weigh the pros and cons, and decide if the Xperia S is for you. If the answer is a yes, you will be looking at a price tag of S$898 without a two-year contract, a price that is the norm amongst the range of dual-core smartphones out in the market today.

  • Sony Xperia S review

    Plus

      High-quality display, great camera, good for multimedia, decent storage

    Minus

      Poor battery life, large form factor awkward for typing

    ConclusionThe Sony Xperia S offers a fantastic display and great multimedia features, but is let down by very poor battery life. It also needs an upgrade to Android Ice Cream Sandwich.

  • Sony Xperia S review

    Conclusion The Sony Xperia S looks good and packs a decent set of hardware components, including an excellent screen and camera. Aside from the standard Android complaint of abysmal battery life, the phone is let down by its main control buttons – a triumph of art over function – and cluttered and out-of-date software. It's relatively low price may make it worth a look.

  • Inget betyg
    Sony Xperia S Android smartphone

    Plus

    • Quad-band GSM /GPRS/EDGE support
    • 3G with 14.4 Mbps HSDPA and 5.76 Mbps HSUPA
    • 4.3" 16M-color capacitive LED-backlit LCD touchscreen of 720p resolution (720 x 1280 pixels) with Sony Mobile BRAVIA engine; Scratch-resistant glass
    • Android OS v2.3.7 Gingerbread, planned Android 4.0 ICS update
    • Dual-core 1.5 GHz Scorpion CPU, 1 GB RAM, Adreno 220 GPU, Qualcomm Snapdragon MSM8260 chipset
    • 12 MP autofocus camera with LED flash and geo-tagging, Multi Angle shot
    • 1080p video recording @ 30fps with continuous autofocus and stereo sound
    • 1.3 MP front-facing camera, 720p video recording
    • Wi-Fi b/g/n and DLNA
    • GPS with A-GPS, GLONASS
    • 32GB built-in storage
    • microHDMI port, dedicated TV launcher
    • microUSB port (charging) and stereo Bluetooth v2.1
    • Standard 3.5 mm audio jack
    • Stereo FM radio with RDS
    • Voice dialing
    • Adobe Flash 11 support
    • Deep Facebook integration
    • PlayStation Certified, access to the PS Store
    • Accelerometer and proximity sensor

    Minus

    • The competition will soon have phones with quad-core CPUs...
    • ...and Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich out of the box
    • Display has sub-par viewing angles
    • No microSD card slot
    • microSIM only
    • Shutter key isn't particularly comfortable

    8 år sedan
  • Inget betyg
    Sony Xperia S review

    The Xperia S is a solid ‘first’ Android smartphone from Sony, but there are a few too many foibles for us to recommend it — particularly at this price. Shipping with Android 4.0 ICS would certainly lift our opinion, but we doubt the imminent upgrade will improve the weak battery life, or sort out those unresponsive buttons.

  • Inget betyg
    Sony Xperia S

    The latest do everything phone from Sony - the Xperia S. In a form factor little bigger than just a mobile phone you can surf the Internet, get your emails, make and receive phone calls and use third party Android software to keep in touch.

  • Inget betyg
    Hands-on: Sony Xperia S

    ConclusionSony's CES 2012 press conference held at the Las Vegas Convention Center was anything but spectacular. Though its special guests such as Hollywood actor Will Smith and Grammy winner Kelly Clarkson were a nice treat, the focus falls squarely on the unveiling of its devices. Sony is no stranger to the Android platform, given that it has launched the Sony Tablet S with Google Android Honeycomb last year. Its mobile portfolio is particularly important, given the acquisition and merger of the Sony Ericsson joint venture as a subsidiary of the Japanese company will be happening in 2012. Named as Sony Mobile Communications, this move will strengthen its existing portfolio of Android devices. With this merger, the Xperia smartphone portfolio now falls under the Sony brand, and during the CES 2012 press conference, the Sony Xperia Ion and Sony Xperia S were unveiled. Along with these two smartphones, Sony also introduced its first Walkman running Google Android Gingerbread, the Sony Mobile Entertainment Player Z1000 series. Since the Sony Xperia Ion is an LTE-based smartphone and exclusive to AT&T in the US, we'll be focusing our hands-on experience with the Sony Xperia S. Similar to Huawei's earlier Ascend P1 and P1 S announcement, the Sony Xperia S came in pretty late with a dual-core entry. Fortunately, it comes in with a big bang, presenting a Qualcomm Snapdragon dual-core 1.5GHz processor. The Xperia S and its blockish design is a far departure from Sony Ericsson's arc design that has been prominent on its 2011 lineup. Admittedly, we were apprehensive on its handling with the angular design, but we were fortunately proven wrong once we held the Xperia S in our hands. It proved to be quite a natural fit, and we didn't really feel any strain from its 144g weight. During its initial launch, the Xperia S will be pre-loaded with Google Android 2.3.7 Gingerbread. Nonetheless, Sony has stated that the Ice Cream Sandwich update is slated for the Xperia S, sometime in Q2 2012. As such, the Xperia S will still come with the three usual touch sensitive controls just below its display acting as the menu, home and back button. We were surprised that the thin plastic band wasn't the physical controls, instead acting as the indicator for the touch sensitive controls just above it. Considering that Google Android 4.0 eliminates the need for physical controls, the inconspicuous design will ready the Xperia S for a proper Ice Cream Sandwich experience. What we really like about the device, is the matte chassis surrounding it. From a practical point of view, this will make it much easier to handle and have a firm grip on the Xperia S. Aesthetically speaking, we are looking at the elimination of fingerprint smudges on the device. Well, almost, since you'll see that happening on its 4.3-inch display. Flipping to the sides, we noticed that the camera and volume buttons are flushed into the body, which doesn't make it any easier for us to access it. Speaking of which, you are looking at another device that comes with a screen resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels. On a 4.3-inch display, we have to admit that it won't make a huge difference, but it's an option we love to have. As to whether the higher resolution will affect its overall battery mileage, we can only be the judge of it at a later date when we get our hands on a review unit to test its 1750mAh battery. The Xperia S is also NFC-enabled, and we also spotted how the Android smartphone uses NFC tags to activate settings such as Bluetooth and profile switching with just a simple tap. Moreover, the Xperia SmartTags work with any NFC enabled smartphone, launching a pre-configured profile in the phone, such as the alarm clock for a SmartTag by your bed or a GPS application for the SmartTag in your car. The Sony Xperia S will be available in black and silver at its launch. Global availability of the device is expected from Q1 2012,  though pricing details for the Sony smartphone has not been revealed as of now.